BGN_constance iloh

Constance Iloh is an education scholar with research expertise on for-profit higher education, college access, and college equity.  She is currently an advanced Ph.D Candidate at the University of Southern California, Gates Millennium Scholar, and Research Associate in the Pullias Center for Higher Education.  Prior to USC, Constance earned a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland, College Park and a Master’s degree in Business Management from Wake Forest University. Her research addresses two primary areas: (1) equity, access, and the experiences of underserved student groups in postsecondary education, and (2) privatization in higher education. Constance particularly focuses on students and practices within the spaces of for-profit colleges and universities. She is especially interested in the high number of low-income students, working adults, and students of color enrolled in for-profit colleges and universities. One of her latest projects includes a seven-month ethnography of a for-profit college. Constance has authored several peer-reviewed journal articles concerning the privatization of higher education. Most recently, she published an article titled, Understanding For-Profit College and Community College Choice through Rational Choice,” in the prestigious education journal Teachers College Record.

 

Constance’s insights, research, and publications are highly regarded for offering a nuanced and textured perspective on the state of higher education for marginalized groups as well as the nature of the student presence in the for-profit sector. In this year alone, Constance has already given an invited lecture at the acclaimed Hammer Museum on “The Privatization of Education,” served as guest panelist on the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans’ discussion on college affordability, appeared as a guest on LATalk Live Radio discussing racism in education, and was given her own invited lecture at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill titled “Degrees of Separation? Understanding the Complexity and College-Going Culture of the For-Profit Higher Education Sector.”  Constance is currently working on her dissertation, which explores the nature of Black student college-going to the for-profit higher education sector, as Black students are the highest enrolled racial group at for-profit colleges and universities. For all these reasons and more esteemed scholars like Dr. Shaun Harper, Executive Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education, have said of Constance, “She is destined to become one of the biggest stars and most respected scholars in our field.” To learn more about this phenomenal thinker, speaker, and researcher visit Constance Iloh’s website at http://www.constanceiloh.com.