In the mood for a more noteworthy movie? You asked for it, and Austin’s Fantastic Fest has delivered as promised. This year’s outstanding line up included more multicultural and cross-global array of films. The World Is Yours is a French film that explores the caverns of criminal activity, and the people who love them. All of which builds up to a final scene that begs the question, who is really hurt in the end by crime? The World Is Yours is most notable for its impressive mise-en-scène and strong female leads. This motion picture is a must see for anyone looking to explore venues outside the standard norm.

Fantastic Fest is a local event that caters to all new and continual audiences. This year’s motion picture The World Is Yours, directed by Romain Gavras, shows a close-knit criminal family and the distances they will go for one another. Gavras, with his impressive understanding of film and media, travels to different parts of the globe to show a more wide casting association between people. He connects people — not just the languages spoken — by the character’s fashion, lands, humor, foods, and dreams each one of them holds. The movie finds ways to join audiences from different walks of life, in one theater in order to see how everyone is linked by the human condition. This is just one of Gavras’ many talents in filmmaking.

The World Is Yours dives into the personal life of a very motivated François (Karim Leklou) who proves to be a very lovable, if not odd, drug dealer. He has a mind for business, so it is no stretch that he cleverly inserts lottery tickets in his drug bags to increase sales. That way if they win, he also wins by selling more. His ultimate goal is to open up his very own Mr. Freeze franchise in North Africa. However, along with any dream, there are obstacles, even for those living a less than ethical lifestyle. His eccentric, fashion iconic, stern mother, who happens to be a con artist played by Isabelle Adjani, has gambled away his savings, and now has to find a way to make his dreams a reality.

Francois must now find another way to open up his business, so he accepts one final heist. He goes on a trip to Spain to collect one last inventory delivery of products from a less than reputable drug lord. In order to ensure things go smoothly, he enlists the help of his best friend (Vincent Cassel), and his love interest (Oulaya Amamra). Along with these two helpful companions, he is joined by two of the most fatuous stooges who he has ever laid eyes on. Both of his new companions just so happen to be named Muhammad. But like in any great heist, nothing goes as planned, especially now with both Muhammads.

There are always layers that need to be explored. In The World Is Yours once you peel the first layer two more pop up in its place. The maxim “There is no honor among thieves” is often thrown around, but does this hold true to a family of thieves? The script and narrative excavate that very notion. There is such a plethora of moving parts that it is nearly impossible to determine who is on whose side and for how long. This mystery will keep audiences in suspense until the final words are spoken. It is just one scandalous twist after another.

There comes a film every once in a while that attempts to reinvent the genre, this is not that. The elaborate heist movies are seen across the board, every so often a new one is born. What this does that others do not, is that it incorporates more styles and cinematic genres than others of the same category. The usage of humor across the flick — and even a musical dance number is out of the ordinary with these kinds of films, excitingly enough, it only adds to the flavor of this rich cultural smorgasbord of diversity. The cast is so on point with their acting, that you actually start to root for the bad guys and girls. Each scene is a cinematic work of art, that incorporates so much humor, or fashion that leaves the viewers wanting to see what happens next. 

The acting is so perfect that it is hard to imagine how it can get any more so. With Romain Gavras directing the script so flawlessly, and Adjani, Cassel, and the oh so loveable Francois acting in it, all produces an unadulterated work of art. For those seeking to explore a new realm of performance, The World is Yours is just the movie you have been waiting for.

If for some reason you were not able to attend Fantastic Fest in Austin TX, I would encourage you to find this film playing elsewhere, get your favorite bag of popcorn, have a cold drink, and invite some friends, because this movie is none like you have seen before. Alternatively, screen the film before inviting friends over for quality purposes.