Guest Poster: Bibi G. B.K.A. Kay-B

For the few of you who may be new to comics or massively large comic book franchise films that have taken over our life, Spider-Man: Homecoming is the newest iteration of your friendly, masked, teenage, neighborhood superhero, Spider-Man. In this version, Queens, New York resident Peter Parker is an ordinary high school student, with brains and a huge crush on Liz Allen. He lives with his Aunt May after his uncle is killed, and gets bitten by a spider, giving him heightened senses, strength, and web-slinging abilities. There have been many on-screen reboots, but here are 3 reasons why this one is my favorite thus far and why you should check it out when it hits theaters on July 7th!

Michael Keaton as Vulture.

Michael Keaton has long since been one of my favorites, and now from Batman to Birdman, he has become Vulture. The difference with this winged character portrayal is that he is not the good guy or the hero, he is villain-esque. With his criminal tendencies fueled by power, his love of money, and his drive to keep his family supported, Vulture emerges as a blue-collar worker who happens to find some Chitauri tech with his crew (on a top-secret salvaging job at the Avengers former headquarters nonetheless), that changes their lives. His salvaging team equipped with a pretty ambitious tech engineer who takes this tech and makes weapons to sell on the black market. The rest of his crew actually does his bidding on the streets, so his identity remains anonymous. While Vulture needs anger management courses, Keaton actually does the role a great justice striking between sleazy criminal and overly protective and doting family man.

The Iron Man Mentorship Program. 

The relationship between Tony Stark and Peter is a delight to watch. Tony — still a bit self-absorbed, even in his superheroic quests — meets Peter and immediately becomes someone that Peter aspires to be. With Peter’s uncle’s death serving as one of the catalysts in his life spurring him to want to see more justice in the world, Tony steps in at the right moment. Peter looks up to Tony as a veteran superhero who first came out on the scene and revealed himself to the public. Tony, in Peter’s eyes, is brilliant, wealthy, knowledgeable, and saves the world on a consistent basis. For Peter, Tony has all of the answers. In return, Tony initially views Peter as an extraordinary superhero, almost forgetting his age and lack of real world experience and knowledge until the events of Captain America: Civil War, reminds him of these things. In this film, you see how eager Peter is to be accepted by Tony. How eager he is to get his mentorship, direction, and approval. He wants to help and wants to be his sidekick. He makes some mistakes — after all, he is 15 — and Tony has to father him back on the right path, but I think they both learn and grow and become better versions of themselves through this unofficial mentor/mentee, father/son, brotherly relationship.

Tom Holland as Peter/Spider-Man. 

Tom Holland gives an electric performance as Peter Parker and Spider-man. As Peter, he strikes the perfect balance of typical teenager: a curious science nerd, filled with a little bit of angst and some defiant behavior, all while pining over the girl of his dreams. As Spider-Man, he is headstrong but has heart. He is a 15-year-old kid who genuinely wants to save the world and now has these superhuman abilities to do so. He impressively takes this seriously and even refuses to let his identity be known. He wants to make a difference and while childish in his approach at times, is mature enough to understand the weight of that responsibility. Peter, along with his crew of bright and carefree friends, make this movie a pleasant and lighthearted delight.

So, if you like superhuman action, great friendships, winged villains on a family mission, the comic relief that only a self-absorbed Tony Stark/Iron Man can provide, and a superhero with heart and homework, then check out Spider-Man: Homecoming when it hits theaters July 7th!

Bibi G. (aka Kay-B) is Contributor and Podcaster on Black Girl Nerds and writer on Just About Write reviewing TV and film.